jump to navigation

From the geoblogosphere – dikes and tsunamis 9 October 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, geoscience.
Tags: , , ,
comments closed

A couple of very interesting new geoblogosphere posts of strong volcanic interest:

Dike swarms and continental barcodes from Highly Allocthonous – the ‘magnetic barcodes’ of dikes in now separate continental fragments can be matched up, showing that at the time the dikes were created the fragments in question were in close enough proximity to be affected by the same episode of igneous intrusion.

Volcanic flank collapse and tsunamis from Dave’s Landslide Blog – a discussion of the Tongatapu boulders, possibly the largest tsunami debris yet identified, the result (it is argued) of a submarine volcanic eruption and flank collapse. 

The Volcanism Blog

Advertisements

The geoblogosphere at geoberg.de (updated) 30 September 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, geoscience, miscellaneous.
Tags: , ,
comments closed

As noted here on 26 September, the German geology site geoberg.de has published a categorized list of geoblogs that is about as comprehensive as any such list could be. The list was initially available only in German, but Lutz at geoberg.de has gone to the trouble of translating it into English – many thanks to him!

The list is constantly being updated and revised (currently standing at 101 blogs), and you can leave suggestions for further additions and revisions via the comments facility on both English and German lists. The links to both versions of the list are as follows:

This list, which was initially published on 27 August 2008, is now spreading across the Anglophone geoblogosphere, which is great. Credit where credit is due, however: Kevin Nelstead at The GeoChristian posted about the geoberg.de list back on 11 September (which is where I heard about it).

The Volcanism Blog

The geoblogosphere at geoberg.de 26 September 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, geoscience, miscellaneous.
Tags: , ,
comments closed

Thanks to a posting at The GeoChristian I’ve just taken a look at a list of geoblogs posted at the German site geoberg.de, and I find that The Volcanism Blog is included, a fact of which I was unaware (although looking at my site statistics I see a steady flow of traffic from that source, so I should have spotted it really). Thanks to geoberg.de for listing this blog.

One of the points to emerge from Callan Bentley’s survey of the geoblogosphere is that it is hard to keep track of the ever-rising number of geoblogs out there (another was the importance of keeping an eye on your site statistics, ahem). There is no complete directory of geoblogs, but the geoberg.de list is the best I’ve seen so far. At the moment it lists 95 blogs, categorized according to topic.

UPDATE: As noted in the comments section below, much public-spirited nocturnal labour has produced an English-language version of the geoberg.de directory, listing over 100 geoblogs. Click here to view the list in English. Many thanks to Lutz at geoberg.de for all his work on this invaluable list.

The Volcanism Blog

The geoblogosphere surveyed 26 September 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, miscellaneous.
Tags: , ,
comments closed

Callan Bentley of the NOVA Geoblog has just given a talk on ‘The Rise of the Geoblogosphere’ to the Geological Society of Washington, and has posted a detailed summary and slideshow presentation on his blog. The results of Callan’s recent survey of the geoblogosphere (in which The Volcanism Blog did not participate, mea culpa) provide interesting insights into what people think of the geoblogs and geoblogging and why they themselves geoblog.* It’s fascinating stuff.

* Favourite reason given: ‘To stop mom from emailing me for news all the time’.

The Volcanism Blog

Lunar Crater Volcanic Field at ‘Pools and Riffles’ 11 August 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, geoscience, United States.
Tags: ,
comments closed

There’s a lovely profile, with pictures, of Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada, at Pools and Riffles – the blog of a ‘hydrologist working on a wildlife refuge in the desert of Nevada trying to balance the needs of wildlife with the ever increasing human demand for water’. A wonderful landscape, fascinatingly explained: ‘Lunar Crater Volcanic Field’.

The Volcanism Blog

The Eruptions blog reaches its century 1 August 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, miscellaneous.
Tags: ,
comments closed

The excellent Eruptions blog, which set up shop at the beginning of May, has already reached 100 posts. Congratulations to Erik Klemetti on reaching this milestone!

The Volcanism Blog

Mapping seismicity in southern Chile 23 June 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, Chaitén, Chile, geoscience.
Tags: , , , ,
comments closed

Rafael Peralta has brought his Enjambre de Aysén blog to my attention. It focuses on seismicity along the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone that dominates southern Chile for around 1000km: Chaitén is pretty much right in the middle. The blog publishes seismic maps derived from USGS data (hence the quakes of 28/29/30 May, which seemed to hit a USGS blindspot, are not shown). An excerpt showing the Chaitén region, showing the quakes that preceded the eruption is given below. Visit Enjambre de Aysén to find out more.

//sismoaysen.blogspot.com/

[Credit: Rafael Peralta]

For all our Chaitén coverage: Chaitén << The Volcanism Blog

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Chaitén – summary information for Chaitén (1508-41)
ONEMI, Oficina Nacional de Emergencia – Chilean government emergencies office (Spanish)
SERNAGEOMIN – Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (Spanish)

The Volcanism Blog

Accretionary Wedge #10 – Geology in Art 17 June 2008

Posted by admin in blogs.
Tags: ,
comments closed

Joseph Wright of Derby, View of Vesuvius (1774)

John Van Hoesen at Geological Musings in the Taconic Mountains… has done a great job of hosting the latest Accretionary Wedge on ‘Geology in Art’, and his article bringing together the various submissions is a work of art in its own right. There’s also a very rich crop of submissions, so follow the link below and explore, learn, and enjoy…

Accretionary Wedge #10: Geology in Art

The Volcanism Blog

Japan: Kurikoma activity raises questions 17 June 2008

Posted by admin in activity reports, blogs, geoscience, Japan, Kurikoma.
Tags: , , , ,
comments closed

Hot gas plumes thought to consist of volcanic gases have been detected 7km south-west of the summit of Mt Kurikoma, a 1628m stratovolcano in northern Honshu (see Erik’s Eruptions blog for more). Kurikoma last erupted in 1950, and has in general a rather sketchy eruptive history.

The volcano is in the area affected by Friday’s 6.8M earthquake, so are these phenomena related? Here’s what the Japanese press report says:

Associate Prof. Sadato Ueki of Tohoku University’s Research Center for the Prediction of Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions said the plumes might be volcanic gases rising to the Earth’s surface.

‘There’s a possibility that volcanic gases that had been confined below ground are gushing out through fissures in the mountain created by the earthquake,’ he said.

Ueki said it was also possible that the plumes were steam coming from underground hot water channels that had their course diverted by the earthquake.

But the professor ruled out the possibility of increased volcanic activity on Mt. Kurikoma, saying that the plumes were very far from the summit of the volcano.

So the professor is suggesting the plumes might be by-products of the earthquake. Kim at All of My Faults Are Stress-Related similarly asks ‘Did the earthquake … cause Kurikoma to start acting up?’, but also observes that this was a rather unusual earthquake. It was along a thrust fault, but it was in Honshu’s volcanic arc, which is not where you would expect a thrust earthquake to be. Kim asks whether the quake itself might be the result of local magmatism: ‘the fault mechanism isn’t surprising. But the location is. Is this a case where the magmatism created a weaker zone in the crust and allowed thrust faulting to take place?’

It will be interesting to watch what happens.

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Kurikoma – summary information for Kurikoma (0803-21=)

News
Hot gas plumes detected at Mt. KurikomaDaily Yomiuri Online, 17 June 2008

The Volcanism Blog

A volcano tour of Italy 16 June 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, Italy.
Tags: ,
comments closed

John Van Hoesen’s blog Geological Musings in the Taconic Mountains…, as well as hosting the current Accretionary Wedge (for my contribution, click here), features a richly-illustrated account of his recent tour of notable Italian volcanoes: Etna, Vulcano, Stromboli … vivid descriptions and some great pictures.

Volcano Tour of Italy…

The Volcanism Blog