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Yellowstone’s Jake Lowenstern on YouTube 20 April 2009

Posted by admin in United States, web resources, Yellowstone.
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Jake Lowenstern is the scientist-in-charge at the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. There’s a three-part presentation by him available on YouTube, talking about Yellowstone and the work his team does there. For more, including links to all three videos, see Callan Bentley’s NOVA Geoblog: Lowenstern interview on YouTube.

Tip of the hat to Callan Bentley for telling us about this, and to his former student Stef who told him about it.

The Volcanism Blog

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The Volcanism Blog on Regator 4 February 2009

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, miscellaneous, web resources.
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This is a bit slow of me, but I’ve only just become aware that The Volcanism Blog is included in Regator, a superior hand-crafted blog aggregator. It’s one of the twenty blogs that make up the ‘geology’ channel, including such first-rate places as Magma Cum Laude, NOVA Geoblog, Eruptions, Highly Allocthonous and Olelog, and was added on 11 December 2008. The Volcanism Blog’s Regator profile is here.

To be included in Regator a blog has to be regularly updated, on-topic, well written (‘good grammar is good for you’ – three cheers to Regator for that), have an RSS feed, have original content, not be spammy, and be ‘awesome’ (their word). Well, I take it very kindly that this blog has not been found wanting in these respects, and furthermore is believed to be awesome. Thanks.

Find out what Regator is all about here.

The Volcanism Blog

The Volcanism Blog is a redOrbit Blog of the Day 31 January 2009

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, miscellaneous, web resources.
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redOrbit Blog of the Day

The redOrbit Knowledge Network ‘is an online community specifically for those with an interest in science, space, health and technology’. The folks at redOrbit got in touch to say that they have selected The Volcanism Blog as one of their Blogs of the Day for 31 January 2009, which is a clearly a recognition worth having.

My thanks to redOrbit – please pay them a visit, and take some time to explore their site.

The Volcanism Blog

A new geoblog list 8 January 2009

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, web resources.
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A new list of the ‘100 Best Blogs for Earth Science Scholars’ was published a little while ago at this site. The Volcanism Blog is in the list, which is much appreciated.

The Volcanism Blog

Hurrah for the geoblogosphere 9 June 2008

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The world of geoblogging is thriving. To see how, pay a visit to Highly Allocthonous where Chris Rowan has posted a list of all the geoblogs currently featured in his invaluable geoblogosphere feed: 45 in all.

And not only do geoblogs have the best images, the best in-depth posts, the best cutting-edge science, the best opinions and insights, they also have the best names. Check them out: Highly Allocthonous, Active Margin, Clastic Detritus, Harmonic Tremors, goodSchist, Magma Cum Laude … inspired stuff. That’s why I chose a boring descriptive name for this place. Just couldn’t compete.

The Volcanism Blog

Blog to watch: Eruptions 26 May 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, geoscience, volcanoes, volcanology, web resources.
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Eruptions is a new volcanology blog run by Dr Erik W. Klemetti, who is a post-doctoral scholar in geology (igneous petrology/volcanology) at UC-Davis.

Dr Klemetti’s aim is ‘to try to summarize eruptions as they occur, translate some of the volcanic processes that are happening and comment on the reports themselves’. The blog began on 2 May, which was nice timing because on the same day Chaitén erupted. Excellent coverage of that eruption ensued.

Highly recommended: Eruptions.

The Volcanism Blog

The podClast: episode 3 11 May 2008

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That excellent instance of blogging enterprise, the goodSchist podClast, has reached episode 3. The third episode features Chris Town (goodSchist), Ron Schott (Ron Schott’s Geology Home Companion), Brian Romans (Clastic Detritus), and Ralph Harrington (The Volcanism Blog), yes, that’s me at the end there. Among the topics discussed Chaitén loomed large, as did the wonderful Gigapan project.

It was a fascinating discussion to participate in, and I learned a lot from taking part – my thanks to Chris, Ron and Brian. These guys have so much knowledge, and are so generous with it. Listen and enjoy!

goodSchist >> The podClast: episode 3

The Volcanism Blog

The ‘eight volcano types’ at Andrew’s Geology Blog 13 April 2008

Posted by admin in blogs, images, volcanology, web resources.
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Andrew Alden has a typically well-organized and informative article at his Geology Blog on ‘The Eight Volcano Types’, illustrated with excellent clear photographs of particular examples of each type. ‘It appears’, he writes, ‘that there are eight basic volcano structures to be found on land, on Earth. There are others under the sea and on other planets, but you aren’t likely to come upon one’. The eight types in question are: lava dome, cinder or scoria cone, maar, tuff ring, tuya or subglacial volcano, stratovolcano, shield volcano, caldera.

The Volcanism Blog

Geoblogs: The Lost Geologist 1 April 2008

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Thanks to The Lost Geologist for linking to the Volcanism Blog in the most recent of the LG’s very useful ongoing catalogue of geoblogs. There’s lots of interesting stuff at The Lost Geologist, and some very nice mineral images. A good post with volcanic content is this one on the extinct Hohentwiel volcano in southern Germany: lots of tuff.

The Volcanism Blog

USGS CoreFacts: ‘short on time, big on science’ 31 March 2008

Posted by admin in current research, geoscience, volcanology, web resources.
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In a recent post we linked to a United States Geological Survey podcast about the current activity at Kilauea: Dramatic Developments at Kilauea Volcano. This is one of a series of USGS CoreCasts in which experts talk about many aspects of earth science, the environment, natural hazards and more. The full list can be found here.

The USGS also offer CoreFacts, bite-size daily podcasts each of which asks and answers a natural sciences question. Here are some examples from recent editions, selected with volcanic interests in mind:

  • Is there evidence for a cause and effect relationship between eruptions that occur at about the same time from volcanoes located hundreds to thousands of kilometers apart?
  • Where did the term ‘volcano’ come from?
  • What is the greatest hazard presented by Mount Rainier?
  • TRUE or FALSE: Portland, Oregon, has a volcano within its metropolitan area.

Each CoreFact is transcribed so that you can get access without even knowing what a podcast is or how to make one work. And you can contact the CoreFacts team yourself, and suggest a question that they can answer in future editions.

U.S. Geological Survey: USGS CoreCast (‘It’s natural science from the inside out’)

U.S. Geological Survey: USGS CoreFacts (‘Short on time, big on science’)

CoreCast and CoreFacts are great examples of the way the USGS is using the web for public outreach. For more on the USGS’s commitment to public information and the great work the Survey is doing, read Andrew Alden’s post today at his Geology Blog: ‘Keep up with Kilauea (and thank the USGS)’.

The Volcanism Blog