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A new Icelandic volcanoes and earthquakes blog 8 October 2010

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, Iceland, volcano monitoring.
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Iceland is volcanoes, and anyone who has been following volcanic events in Iceland recently — and there have been plenty, of course — will be familiar with the work of Jón Frímann, who (to quote Erik Klemetti) ‘has information on every noise the volcanoes of Iceland make’. He’s been sharing that information via the comments threads at Eruptions for some time, and has now set up his own blog, the Iceland Volcano and Earthquake blog. It’s dense with detail about what the volcanoes of Iceland are up to: earthquakes, tremor, inflation/deflation, emissions, the lot. Essential reading if you want to know what is happening in the land of fire and ice.

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Take a cruise around the Mariana Islands (at Eruptions) 15 July 2010

Posted by admin in geoblogosphere, Pacific.
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The volcanoes of the Mariana Islands have been in the news recently: Pagan and Sarigan have both been featuring in the Global Volcanism Program’s regular reports in recent weeks. To find out more about the volcanically fascinating Mariana Islands you couldn’t do better than visit the Eruptions blog, where Dr Ed Kohut is guest blogging while Erik Klemetti takes a break (a field work break). It’s an incredibly informative and illuminating article, and this is only part 1. Check it out: A volcanic cruise through the Mariana Islands.

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Geoscientist Online takes a look at the geoblogosphere 3 May 2010

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Geoscientist is the admirable monthly magazine for the Fellows of the Geological Society of London, and it is available free at Geoscientist Online.

There’s an interesting article by Michael Welland in the current (May 2010) issue of Geoscientist Online which takes a look at the geoblogosphere. It’s always illuminating when someone takes a step back and takes in a wider perspective on the world of geoblogs, and Michael has some interesting observations on the state of the geoblogosphere and particularly what it has to offer practising geoscientists, and raises the issue of the relative under-representation of UK-based geoblogs in the current geoblogosphere (he also lists a number of British geoblogs, including, I’m pleased to say, this one).

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Recent volcanism and deep time, at Geotripper 30 August 2009

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Geotripper, written by California geology teacher Garry Hayes, is a first-class geology blog that brims over with information, enthusiasm and great imagery.

‘Time almost not beyond imagining: recent volcanism on the Colorado Plateau and deep time’ is the latest in a series of Geotripper posts devoted to the geological history of the Colorado Plateau. The article looks at the eruption 1.15 million years ago that produced the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, and, taking as a starting point the thousand-year-old ruined settlement in the caldera that is now the Bandelier National Monument, reflects on geological and human scales of time:

But 1.15 million years? Even though we have actually covered 2 billion years in this series on the Colorado Plateau, I sometimes find even a million years difficult to comprehend. One million. One thousand thousand. The entire history of Bandelier’s village, from construction to abandonment to tourist destination could be repeated 1,000 times to reach the time when the volcano exploded.

An excellent piece of writing. As ever, thinking about these things leaves one somewhat giddy: but that’s geology for you.

Time almost not beyond imagining: recent volcanism on the Colorado Plateau and deep time – Geotripper, 29 August 2009

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Dr Erik Klemetti is in The Reef Tank 13 July 2009

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, volcanology.
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The Reef Tank is a bulletin-board (although there’s much more to it than that term implies) for aquarists to discuss matters aquatic. They take an admirably broad view of their subject area, and have published a great interview with Dr Erik Klemetti of the Eruptions blog in which marine connections with volcanism are expertly dissected. Dr Klemetti also talks about his inspiration in setting up Eruptions (and has some nice things to say about The Volcanism Blog in passing).

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Dr Erik Klemetti’s Eruptions blog is now at ScienceBlogs 13 March 2009

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The Lords of the ScienceBlogs Universe have obviously been paying attention to the movers and shakers in the world of geoblogging. Not long ago Kim at All of My Faults Are Stress Related made the move to ScienceBlogs, and today comes the news that Dr Erik Klemetti of the excellent Eruptions blog is following suit.

It’s great to see that ScienceBlogs is not only expanding its geology content (that has to be good news – far too many biology/biomedical types running amok over there), but has taken volcanoes to its heart. It’s a recognition not only of the quality of Erik’s blogging, but the fascination and importance of the subject he blogs about.

The new home of Eruptions is at http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/.

UPDATE, 20 March 2009: Erik has migrated the archives of the old Eruptions blog over to ScienceBlogs. This seems to mean that some – not all – of the links to old Eruptions posts no longer work. There are a lot of links to Eruptions posts in this blog. I’m sorry if some of them are now broken, but it’s beyond my control.

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‘All of My Faults Are Stress Related’ makes the move to ScienceBlogs 4 March 2009

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‘All of My Faults Are Stress Related’, Kim Hannula’s excellent geoblog, has made the move to ScienceBlogs. Kim, they are lucky to have you.

(The old version of Kim’s blog can be found here.)

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Backyard lava from NOVA Geoblog 18 February 2009

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Every hot rocks fan should see the video that Callan Bentley has up at his NOVA Geoblog of the successful attempt by a friend and colleague of his to make lava in his backyard, using just two rock samples and an acetylene torch.

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The Volcanism Blog on Regator 4 February 2009

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This is a bit slow of me, but I’ve only just become aware that The Volcanism Blog is included in Regator, a superior hand-crafted blog aggregator. It’s one of the twenty blogs that make up the ‘geology’ channel, including such first-rate places as Magma Cum Laude, NOVA Geoblog, Eruptions, Highly Allocthonous and Olelog, and was added on 11 December 2008. The Volcanism Blog’s Regator profile is here.

To be included in Regator a blog has to be regularly updated, on-topic, well written (‘good grammar is good for you’ – three cheers to Regator for that), have an RSS feed, have original content, not be spammy, and be ‘awesome’ (their word). Well, I take it very kindly that this blog has not been found wanting in these respects, and furthermore is believed to be awesome. Thanks.

Find out what Regator is all about here.

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The Volcanism Blog is a redOrbit Blog of the Day 31 January 2009

Posted by admin in blogs, geoblogosphere, miscellaneous, web resources.
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redOrbit Blog of the Day

The redOrbit Knowledge Network ‘is an online community specifically for those with an interest in science, space, health and technology’. The folks at redOrbit got in touch to say that they have selected The Volcanism Blog as one of their Blogs of the Day for 31 January 2009, which is a clearly a recognition worth having.

My thanks to redOrbit – please pay them a visit, and take some time to explore their site.

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