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Two blogging birthdays 25 December 2008

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Many happy returns to two of the very best geoblogs around, Callan’s NOVA Geoblog and Jessica’s Magma Cum Laude, both of which have just marked their first anniversary. Hearty congratulations, and long may you both thrive!

The Volcanism Blog

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The Volcanism Blog at Science News 16 December 2008

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The Volcanism Blog was featured yesterday in a nice article at Science News along with a number of other recommended science blogs. It’s always nice to be noticed. A big thank you to writer Janet Raloff and to Science News for highlighting this blog.

The Volcanism Blog

Goethe’s volcanoes 15 December 2008

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Heinrich Christoph Kolbe, 'Goethe as poet and artist before Vesuvius' (1826), detail. Thuringian University and State Library, Jena.

Goethe Etc. (proprietor: Goethe Girl) is a wonderful scholarly blog exploring the life, work and significance of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832). It features here because, among many other things, Goethe was interested in volcanoes, and when he visited Naples in 1787 during his Italian journey he took the opportunity to study, observe and ascend Vesuvius. The significance of Vesuvius to Goethe’s developing poetic and visual imagination is considered in Goethe and Vesuvius, a fascinating illustrated essay at Goethe Etc.

At the time of Goethe’s visit the British envoy in Naples was Sir William Hamilton, who was also greatly interested in volcanoes. Hamilton, however, was a ‘plutonist’, believing that volcanic action had deep-rooted causes and was a permanent and fundamental geological process, while Goethe espoused the ‘neptunist’ view that volcanoes were superficial phenomena of no profound geological significance.* This aspect of Goethe’s thought is discussed in Goethe and Vesuvius and also in another article at Goethe Etc., Goethe in Bohemia, which illuminates Goethe’s geology.

* Despite their different theories of volcanism Goethe rather admired Sir William, and definitely admired his wife, the (in)famous Emma.

The Volcanism Blog

The Volcanism Blog – one year old today 5 December 2008

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The Volcanism Blog is one year old today.

The Volcanism Blog is one year old today. Since 5 December 2007 we have published 502 posts (including this one) and accumulated more than 195,000 unique visits.

Thanks to all who have visited, read, commented, linked, and contributed information and images over the last year, and to those who have kept in touch, offered criticism and advice, said encouraging and nice things, and otherwise been supportive.

Onward and upward, into another year’s volcanic blogging.

The Volcanism Blog

New geoblogosphere aggregator 26 November 2008

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Building on the geoberg.de list of geoblogs, the folks at the Stratigraphy.net internals blog have put together a new geoblogosphere aggregator. They plan to do something very clever and chronostratigraphic with it in due course. In the meantime it’s a very useful survey of the geoblogosphere, so I’ve added it to the ‘Geoblogs’ section of the link list on the right.

The Volcanism Blog

From the geoblogosphere – dikes and tsunamis 9 October 2008

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A couple of very interesting new geoblogosphere posts of strong volcanic interest:

Dike swarms and continental barcodes from Highly Allocthonous – the ‘magnetic barcodes’ of dikes in now separate continental fragments can be matched up, showing that at the time the dikes were created the fragments in question were in close enough proximity to be affected by the same episode of igneous intrusion.

Volcanic flank collapse and tsunamis from Dave’s Landslide Blog – a discussion of the Tongatapu boulders, possibly the largest tsunami debris yet identified, the result (it is argued) of a submarine volcanic eruption and flank collapse. 

The Volcanism Blog

The geoblogosphere at geoberg.de (updated) 30 September 2008

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As noted here on 26 September, the German geology site geoberg.de has published a categorized list of geoblogs that is about as comprehensive as any such list could be. The list was initially available only in German, but Lutz at geoberg.de has gone to the trouble of translating it into English – many thanks to him!

The list is constantly being updated and revised (currently standing at 101 blogs), and you can leave suggestions for further additions and revisions via the comments facility on both English and German lists. The links to both versions of the list are as follows:

This list, which was initially published on 27 August 2008, is now spreading across the Anglophone geoblogosphere, which is great. Credit where credit is due, however: Kevin Nelstead at The GeoChristian posted about the geoberg.de list back on 11 September (which is where I heard about it).

The Volcanism Blog

The geoblogosphere at geoberg.de 26 September 2008

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Thanks to a posting at The GeoChristian I’ve just taken a look at a list of geoblogs posted at the German site geoberg.de, and I find that The Volcanism Blog is included, a fact of which I was unaware (although looking at my site statistics I see a steady flow of traffic from that source, so I should have spotted it really). Thanks to geoberg.de for listing this blog.

One of the points to emerge from Callan Bentley’s survey of the geoblogosphere is that it is hard to keep track of the ever-rising number of geoblogs out there (another was the importance of keeping an eye on your site statistics, ahem). There is no complete directory of geoblogs, but the geoberg.de list is the best I’ve seen so far. At the moment it lists 95 blogs, categorized according to topic.

UPDATE: As noted in the comments section below, much public-spirited nocturnal labour has produced an English-language version of the geoberg.de directory, listing over 100 geoblogs. Click here to view the list in English. Many thanks to Lutz at geoberg.de for all his work on this invaluable list.

The Volcanism Blog

The geoblogosphere surveyed 26 September 2008

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Callan Bentley of the NOVA Geoblog has just given a talk on ‘The Rise of the Geoblogosphere’ to the Geological Society of Washington, and has posted a detailed summary and slideshow presentation on his blog. The results of Callan’s recent survey of the geoblogosphere (in which The Volcanism Blog did not participate, mea culpa) provide interesting insights into what people think of the geoblogs and geoblogging and why they themselves geoblog.* It’s fascinating stuff.

* Favourite reason given: ‘To stop mom from emailing me for news all the time’.

The Volcanism Blog

Extraterrestrial volcanism on Io at Geology News 23 September 2008

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Io's Tvashtar volcano erupting (NASA image)

There is a superb post about Jupiter’s highly volcanically active moon Io over at Geology News. This kind of richly-illustrated, detailed article really is the geoblogosphere at its best, and is one of Dave Schumaker’s two contributions to what promises to be a first-rate Accretionary Wedge on ‘Geology in Space’. Highly recommended – go and take a look.

N.B. Geology News has passed the 400 posts milestone – congratulations!

Picture: NASA New Horizons image of Io’s Tvashtar volcano erupting (NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute). Source page and more information here.

The Volcanism Blog