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Happy first birthday to Eruptions 1 May 2009

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Eruptions - one year old today!

Dr Erik Klemetti’s flourishing Eruptions blog is one year old today! In that year, Eruptions has become an essential resource for everyone interested in volcanoes and what they are up to. By way of a blogiversary tribute, here’s my choice of five great Eruptions posts:

Happy Birthday to Eruptions, and congratulations to Erik on a year of well-deserved blogging success.

The Volcanism Blog

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Brief intermission 2 April 2009

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I am called away from the keyboard and there’ll be no posting here until Saturday 4 April, probably. Unless something (ahem) extraordinary happens.

By the way, March 2009 was the busiest month for The Volcanism Blog since we started, with a total of 63,930 views. The busiest day was Monday 23 March, the day Redoubt erupted: 6,178 views. Thank you all for dropping in!

The Volcanism Blog

Redoubt not only volcano in world 25 March 2009

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The Volcanism Blog has been somewhat Redoubt-focused over the past few days, and I’ve had e-mails reminding me that there are other volcanoes on the planet and I shouldn’t forget about them. That is quite true, of course, but there is only one of me, I have a limited amount of time, I can’t do everything at once and I don’t get paid for doing this.

However, people concerned that Chaitén, Tonga, Galeras and Koryaksky (to name a few) are not getting their due do have a point, and I will be trying to catch up as best I can with the rest of the world before the end of this week.

And (despite my grumbling above) please don’t be put off getting in touch and telling me what you would like to see this blog covering, what you think there should be less of, and what can be improved. Feedback is always welcome.

The Volcanism Blog

Dr Erik Klemetti’s Eruptions blog is now at ScienceBlogs 13 March 2009

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The Lords of the ScienceBlogs Universe have obviously been paying attention to the movers and shakers in the world of geoblogging. Not long ago Kim at All of My Faults Are Stress Related made the move to ScienceBlogs, and today comes the news that Dr Erik Klemetti of the excellent Eruptions blog is following suit.

It’s great to see that ScienceBlogs is not only expanding its geology content (that has to be good news – far too many biology/biomedical types running amok over there), but has taken volcanoes to its heart. It’s a recognition not only of the quality of Erik’s blogging, but the fascination and importance of the subject he blogs about.

The new home of Eruptions is at http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/.

UPDATE, 20 March 2009: Erik has migrated the archives of the old Eruptions blog over to ScienceBlogs. This seems to mean that some – not all – of the links to old Eruptions posts no longer work. There are a lot of links to Eruptions posts in this blog. I’m sorry if some of them are now broken, but it’s beyond my control.

The Volcanism Blog

‘All of My Faults Are Stress Related’ makes the move to ScienceBlogs 4 March 2009

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‘All of My Faults Are Stress Related’, Kim Hannula’s excellent geoblog, has made the move to ScienceBlogs. Kim, they are lucky to have you.

(The old version of Kim’s blog can be found here.)

The Volcanism Blog

Backyard lava from NOVA Geoblog 18 February 2009

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Every hot rocks fan should see the video that Callan Bentley has up at his NOVA Geoblog of the successful attempt by a friend and colleague of his to make lava in his backyard, using just two rock samples and an acetylene torch.

The Volcanism<br /> Blog

The Volcanism Blog on Regator 4 February 2009

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This is a bit slow of me, but I’ve only just become aware that The Volcanism Blog is included in Regator, a superior hand-crafted blog aggregator. It’s one of the twenty blogs that make up the ‘geology’ channel, including such first-rate places as Magma Cum Laude, NOVA Geoblog, Eruptions, Highly Allocthonous and Olelog, and was added on 11 December 2008. The Volcanism Blog’s Regator profile is here.

To be included in Regator a blog has to be regularly updated, on-topic, well written (‘good grammar is good for you’ – three cheers to Regator for that), have an RSS feed, have original content, not be spammy, and be ‘awesome’ (their word). Well, I take it very kindly that this blog has not been found wanting in these respects, and furthermore is believed to be awesome. Thanks.

Find out what Regator is all about here.

The Volcanism Blog

The Volcanism Blog is a redOrbit Blog of the Day 31 January 2009

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redOrbit Blog of the Day

The redOrbit Knowledge Network ‘is an online community specifically for those with an interest in science, space, health and technology’. The folks at redOrbit got in touch to say that they have selected The Volcanism Blog as one of their Blogs of the Day for 31 January 2009, which is a clearly a recognition worth having.

My thanks to redOrbit – please pay them a visit, and take some time to explore their site.

The Volcanism Blog

A new geoblog list 8 January 2009

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A new list of the ‘100 Best Blogs for Earth Science Scholars’ was published a little while ago at this site. The Volcanism Blog is in the list, which is much appreciated.

The Volcanism Blog

Volcano art at Magma Cum Laude 5 January 2009

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New from Magma Cum Laude: ‘Go for the art, stay for the volcanoes’ is a post on the exhibition Pompeii and the Roman Villa: Art and Culture around the Bay of Naples at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, which Jessica has been fortunate enough to visit. She reproduces some wonderful eighteenth-century paintings of Vesuvius in eruption and some of the beautiful pages from Sir William Hamilton’s Campi Phlegraei (1776). A great article on what looks like a great exhibition.

[And there’s a nice link to this Volcanism Blog post. Thanks!]

The Volcanism Blog