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The wonder of volcanoes at Bad Astronomy 5 March 2012

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Recently-active Tinakula volcano in the Solomon Islands

Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomy blog will, I’m sure, need no introduction to many Volcanism Blog readers (and if you do need an introduction, nothing I could say would beat just going there and seeing for yourself). In a beautiful post today Phil lets rip with his love for volcanoes and gives us some of the most stunning satellite images of volcanoes he’s been able to lay his hands on, including the stunning view of Tinakula above. It’s not just pretty pictures, though: Phil points out that observing volcanoes from space tells us more about them and what they are up to, adding to the knowledge of geologists, volcanologists and seismologists: ‘And given the number of people who live near active volcanoes, this knowledge saves lives. It really is that simple: the better we understand the world — the Universe — around us, the better off we are’.

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A new Icelandic volcanoes and earthquakes blog 8 October 2010

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Iceland is volcanoes, and anyone who has been following volcanic events in Iceland recently — and there have been plenty, of course — will be familiar with the work of Jón Frímann, who (to quote Erik Klemetti) ‘has information on every noise the volcanoes of Iceland make’. He’s been sharing that information via the comments threads at Eruptions for some time, and has now set up his own blog, the Iceland Volcano and Earthquake blog. It’s dense with detail about what the volcanoes of Iceland are up to: earthquakes, tremor, inflation/deflation, emissions, the lot. Essential reading if you want to know what is happening in the land of fire and ice.

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Eruptions finds a new blogging home 1 September 2010

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After eighteen months at ScienceBlogs, Dr Erik Klemetti’s Eruptions blog is on the move. Eruptions can now be found among the blogs hosted at Big Think: the new address is http://bigthink.com/blogs/eruptions/.

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Geoscientist Online takes a look at the geoblogosphere 3 May 2010

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Geoscientist is the admirable monthly magazine for the Fellows of the Geological Society of London, and it is available free at Geoscientist Online.

There’s an interesting article by Michael Welland in the current (May 2010) issue of Geoscientist Online which takes a look at the geoblogosphere. It’s always illuminating when someone takes a step back and takes in a wider perspective on the world of geoblogs, and Michael has some interesting observations on the state of the geoblogosphere and particularly what it has to offer practising geoscientists, and raises the issue of the relative under-representation of UK-based geoblogs in the current geoblogosphere (he also lists a number of British geoblogs, including, I’m pleased to say, this one).

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Brief blowing of own trumpet 21 April 2010

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The Eyjafjallajökull eruption has brought lots of visitors and quite a bit of attention to the Volcanism Blog: welcome, and thank you, to all who have visited and who have linked to our content. Thursday 15 April 2010 brought our highest-ever number of visitors: 20,605. That’s more than three times more than came to the blog at the time of the Mount Redoubt eruption a year ago, our previous one-day record. We are currently averaging something over 5,000 visitors per day.

The Volcanism Blog has been linked from some interesting places, including two articles at the Christian Science Monitor, while yesterday we were featured in the ‘Freshly Pressed’ showcase on the WordPress homepage. And also yesterday (proving that all the real volcanologists were busy) I was interviewed on Bloomberg Radio’s ‘Surveillance’ program: the podcast is available here, but I think you need to subscribe, as in pay up, to hear the whole thing. Finally, I’ll be talking volcanoes on a forthcoming edition of the brilliant Shift-Run-Stop podcast – more news on that shortly.

UPDATE. It’s really great to see our Saturday Volcano Art feature getting a mention on Jonathan Jones’s art blog at The Guardian: Explosive art: my top five volcano paintings. The work of art in question is Frederic Edwin Church’s 1862 painting of Cotopaxi (although as it happens the other four artworks mentioned have been featured here as well).

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Two years of The Volcanism Blog 7 December 2009

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The Volcanism Blog began on 5 December 2007, and was thus two years old on Saturday. Thank you all for visiting, reading and supporting this blog over the past two years.

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The Volcanism Blog on Twitter 16 October 2009

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This was not an easy decision, but I’ve finally decided to start a Twitter account for The Volcanism Blog and begin twitting entwitments. Any advice on how to get the best out of the thing gratefully received: I’m feeling my way with it, to be honest.

http://twitter.com/volcanismblog

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1000 posts at The Volcanism Blog 26 September 2009

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A minor milestone: this is the 1000th post published at The Volcanism Blog since we opened for business on 5 December 2007. Thank you for reading!

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Recent volcanism and deep time, at Geotripper 30 August 2009

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Geotripper, written by California geology teacher Garry Hayes, is a first-class geology blog that brims over with information, enthusiasm and great imagery.

‘Time almost not beyond imagining: recent volcanism on the Colorado Plateau and deep time’ is the latest in a series of Geotripper posts devoted to the geological history of the Colorado Plateau. The article looks at the eruption 1.15 million years ago that produced the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, and, taking as a starting point the thousand-year-old ruined settlement in the caldera that is now the Bandelier National Monument, reflects on geological and human scales of time:

But 1.15 million years? Even though we have actually covered 2 billion years in this series on the Colorado Plateau, I sometimes find even a million years difficult to comprehend. One million. One thousand thousand. The entire history of Bandelier’s village, from construction to abandonment to tourist destination could be repeated 1,000 times to reach the time when the volcano exploded.

An excellent piece of writing. As ever, thinking about these things leaves one somewhat giddy: but that’s geology for you.

Time almost not beyond imagining: recent volcanism on the Colorado Plateau and deep time – Geotripper, 29 August 2009

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Dr Erik Klemetti is in The Reef Tank 13 July 2009

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The Reef Tank is a bulletin-board (although there’s much more to it than that term implies) for aquarists to discuss matters aquatic. They take an admirably broad view of their subject area, and have published a great interview with Dr Erik Klemetti of the Eruptions blog in which marine connections with volcanism are expertly dissected. Dr Klemetti also talks about his inspiration in setting up Eruptions (and has some nice things to say about The Volcanism Blog in passing).

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