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Volcano alert levels: New Zealand

The volcanological authority in New Zealand is GeoNet. In New Zealand two alert level systems are used, one for ‘frequently active volcanoes’ and one for ‘reawakening volcanoes’. Each runs from ‘0’ (lowest) to ‘5’ (highest) as follows.

Alert system for ‘frequently active volcanoes’: Ruapehu, Tongariro-Ngauruhoe, White Island, Kermadec Islands

Volcanic alert level system used by GeoNet for frequently active New Zealand volcanoes (Ruapehu, Tongariro-Ngauruhoe, White Island, Kermadec Islands).

Volcanic alert level system used by GeoNet for frequently active New Zealand volcanoes (Ruapehu, Tongariro-Ngauruhoe, White Island, Kermadec Islands).

Alert Level 0: usual dormant or quiescent state
Typical background surface activity; seismicity, deformation and heat flow at low levels.

Alert Level 1: signs of volcano unrest
Departure from typical background surface activity.

Alert Level 2: minor eruptive activity
Onset of eruptive activity, accompanied by changes in monitored indicators.

Alert Level 3: significant local eruption in progress
Increased vigour of ongoing activity and monitored indicators. Significant effects on volcano, possible effects beyond.

Alert Level 4: hazardous local eruption in progress
Significant change to ongoing activity and monitored indicators. Effects beyond volcano.

Alert Level 5: large hazardous eruption in progress
Hazardous large volcanic eruption in progress.

Alert system for ‘reawakening volcanoes’: Auckland, Mayor Island, Northland, Okataina (including Tarawera), Rotorua, Taranaki (Egmont Volcano)

Volcanic alert system used by GeoNet for reawakening New Zealand volcanoes (Auckland, Mayor Island, Northland, Okataina including Tarawera, Rotorua, Taranaki/Egmont, Taupo).

Volcanic alert system used by GeoNet for reawakening New Zealand volcanoes (Auckland, Mayor Island, Northland, Okataina including Tarawera, Rotorua, Taranaki/Egmont, Taupo).

Alert Level 0: usual dormant or quiescent state
Typical background surface activity; seismicity, deformation and heat flow at low levels.

Alert Level 1: initial signs of possible volcano unrest, no eruption threat
Apparent seismic, geodetic, thermal or other unrest indicators.

Alert Level 2: confirmation of volcano unrest, eruption threat
Increase in number or intensity of unrest indicators (seismicity, deformation, heat flow, etc.).

Alert Level 3: minor eruptions commenced, real possibility of hazardous eruptions
Minor steam eruptions. High-increasing trends of unrest indicators, significant effects on volcano, possibly beyond.

Alert Level 4: hazardous local eruption in progress, large scale eruption possible
Eruption of new magma. Sustained high levels of unrest indicators, significant effects beyond volcano.

Alert Level 5: large hazardous volcanic eruption in progress
Destruction with major damage beyond active volcano. Significant risk over wider areas.

The Volcanism Blog