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Smithsonian/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 22-28 June 2011 4 July 2011

Posted by admin in activity reports, Africa, Ambrym, Batu Tara, Chile, Eritrea, eruptions, Fuego, Guatemala, Hawaii, Indonesia, Kamchatka, Karymsky, Kilauea, Kirishima, Kizimen, Nabro, Pacific, Planchón-Peteroa, Russia, Sakura-jima, Shiveluch, United States, Vanuatu, Weekly Volcanic Activity Reports.
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Here’s the Smithsonian Institution and United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report for the week 22-28 June 2011, compiled by Sally Kuhn Sennert. Some of the highlights:

  • Ambrym: degassing, occasional explosions, light ashfall
  • Nabro: eruption continues, with plumes of water vapour and sulphur dioxide, lava flows and ashfall
  • Puyehue-Cordón Caulle: eruption continues, with active lava flow, and ash clouds affecting air traffic
  • Planchón-Peteroa: ash and gas-and-steam plumes detected

SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 22-28 June 2011

Click on the map for a larger version (1211 x 784 pixels).

The Smithsonian Institution/United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report for 22-28 June 2011 is now available on the Global Volcanism Program website. The following is a summary and not a substitute for the full report.

New activity/unrest: Ambrym (Vanuatu), Kirishima (Japan), Nabro (Eritrea), Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile).

Ongoing activity: Batu Tara (Indonesia), Fuego (Guatemala), Karymsky (Russia), Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Kizimen (Russia), Planchón-Peteroa (Chile), Sakura-jima (Japan), Shiveluch (Russia).

Note: ‘a.s.l.’ = ‘above sea level’.

NEW ACTIVITY/UNREST

Ambrym (Vanuatu). On 27 June, the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory reported that data collected from Ambrym’s monitoring network showed significant degassing daily and occasional explosions in the crater. Field observers noted that the level of the lava lakes was high. During June, villages reported minor ashfall and that acid rain affected vegetables in some areas W, S, and E. The Alert Level remained at 1 (on a scale of 0-4). [GVP: Ambrym]

Kirishima (Japan). Based on notifications from JMA, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 23 June an eruption from Kirishima’s Shinmoe-dake (Shinmoe peak) produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 1.8 km (6,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. [GVP: Kirishima]

Nabro (Eritrea). A satellite image of Nabro acquired on 22 June showed a gas-and-ash plume rising from the caldera and drifting W. According to a news article, the eruption resulted in at least seven deaths, injured many, and displaced thousands in Eritrea, and affected about 5,000 Ethiopians living near the border. Two satellite images acquired on 24 June show the erupting vent, plumes and emissions, and lava flows in detail. One false-colour image highlighted hot areas throughout the lava flow and flow front, as well as hot material above the vent. Gas emissions rising from the lava flow were also detected. A natural-colour image showed fresh but cooled lava flows in the N part of the caldera. A dark ash plume rose from the vent, and at higher altitudes a plume composed of water vapour and sulfur dioxide drifted W and obscured the active lava flow. Black ash deposits covered the landscape to the S and W. During 22-26 June large amounts of sulphur dioxide in the region continued to be detected by satellite images. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Toulouse VAAC reported that during 26-27 June plumes rose to altitudes up to 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. [GVP: Nabro]

Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile). OVDAS-SERNAGEOMIN reported that the eruption continued from the Cordón Caulle rift zone, part of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex. During 22 and 24-26 June cameras installed around the volcano recorded ash plumes that rose 2-4 km above the crater and drifted NW, N, and NE. Although meteorological cloud cover prevented camera observations on 23 and 28 June, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that ash clouds detected in satellite imagery rose to altitudes of 4-4.6 km (13,000-15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NE. On 25 June SERNAGEOMIN noted that satellite images showed that the plume drifted 200 km N then an additional 900 km NNE. The next day the plume drifted 250 km N, then turned NNW and drifted 1,450 km. According to news articles, numerous flights in and around Argentina and Chile were cancelled, as well as some flights in Uruguay. On 27 June satellite images detected a plume that was dense for 300 m then was no longer discernable due to meteorological clouds. News outlets noted that flights in New Zealand had resumed. Ashfall was periodically reported in areas downwind, including in Riñinahue (5-10 mm of ash) Llifen, Futrono, and Curarrehue on 22 June, and Riñinahue, Pucón, and Melipeuco (in the region of Araucanía) on 25 June. Although there were no new aerial observations during 22-27 June, pulses of high-intensity tremor indicated that the lava flow remained active. The Alert Level remained at 6, Red. [GVP: Puyehue-Cordón Caulle]

ONGOING ACTIVITY

Batu Tara (Indonesia). Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 22-25 June ash plumes from Batu Tara rose to an altitude of 2.4 km (8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 35-75 km W and NW. [GVP: Batu Tara]

Fuego (Guatemala). INSIVUMEH reported that during 23-24 June explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 150-200 m above the crater and drifted W. Incandescent bursts rose 100 m above the crater. During 23-24 and 27-28 June lava flows traveled 200 m down the Ceniza drainage to the SW and detached blocks reached vegetated areas. [GVP: Fuego]

Karymsky (Russia). KVERT reported moderate seismic activity at Karymsky during 17-24 June and that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.9 km (12,800 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano during 16-17 June. The Aviation Colour Code remained at Orange. [GVP: Karymsky]

Kilauea (Hawaii, USA). HVO reported that two lava lakes at Kilauea were active during 22-28 June. The level of the summit lava lake fluctuated deep in the vent inset within the E wall of Halema’uma’u Crater. A gas plume from the vent drifted SW, depositing variable amounts of ash nearby. At Pu’u ‘O’o, lava from vents near the NE edge of the perched lava lake in the center of the crater floor continued to fill the lake. The lake level fluctuated and overflowed the edges or flowed through rim breaches, sending lava onto the Pu’u ‘O’o crater floor. A small shield had built up against the SW crater wall on the W side of the lake. On 23 June the rim of the perched lava lake was elevated 6-8 m higher than the surrounding crater floor; the crater floor was 35 m below the E crater rim. The preliminary sulphur dioxide emission rate from all east rift zone sources was calculated at 700 tonnes/day that same day. [GVP: Kilauea]

Kizimen (Russia). KVERT reported that during 16-24 June seismicity from Kizimen was above background levels and volcanic tremor continued to be detected. Seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. during 16-17 June. Satellite images showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano during 17-18 and 20-21 June, and gas-and-steam plumes that drifted 200 km NW during 22-23 June. The Aviation Colour Code remained at Orange. [GVP: Kizimen]

Planchón-Peteroa (Chile). Based on SIGMET notices, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that during 24-25 June ash plumes from Planchón-Peteroa rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W, NE, and E. On 27 June satellite imagery showed a gas-and-steam plume, possibly containing ash, drifting 110 km NW. [GVP: Planchón-Peteroa]

Sakura-jima (Japan). Based on information from JMA, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22, 25, and 28 June plumes from Sakura-jima rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.4 km (6,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and NE. During 27-28 June, pilots observed ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 2.1-3 km (7,000-10,000 ft) a.s.l. [GVP: Sakura-jima]

Shiveluch (Russia). KVERT reported moderate seismic activity at Shiveluch during 17-24 June. Seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. on 19 June and to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 18 and 21 June. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 18 and 20 June and ash plumes drifting 176 km in multiple directions during 20-21 June. The Aviation Colour Code remained at Orange. [GVP: Shiveluch]

The foregoing is a summary of the Smithsonian Institution/United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report covering 22-28 June 2011. It is provided for information only, and is based on but not a substitute for the full report, which comes with its own criteria and disclaimers. The map base is derived from the Smithsonian Institution/USGS/US Naval Research Laboratory This Dynamic Planet website.

For all our coverage of the SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Reports: Weekly Volcanic Activity Reports « The Volcanism Blog.

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