jump to navigation

An Eyjafjallajökull miscellany (further updated) 21 April 2010

Posted by admin in eruptions, Eyjafjöll, Iceland.
Tags: , , ,
trackback

More on the eruption itself later, but for the moment here is a fairly random selection of Eyjafjallajökull links, some good, some bad, some just, you know, strange. [Updated 24 April 2010, new links marked with a *; and updated again 26 April 2010, new links marked with a #.]

UK political crackpot: Iceland volcano a message from God – eruption ‘a clear Biblical sign of repentance’, a reminder that ‘the human race is powerless compared to God’, claims Christian Peoples Alliance election candidate in outpouring of contemptible garbage.#

(How) Are Birds Affected by Volcanic Ash? – some of the effects of ashfall on non-human life: GrrlScientist has the details.

Finnish F-18 meets volcanic ash – pictures of damage to the engines of a Finnish Air Force F-18 fighter that flew through Eyjafjallajökull’s emissions on the morning of 15 April.

Eyjafjallajökull images from the NASA Earth Observatory – the Earth Observatory has been publishing some great satellite imagery of the eruption: the Eyjafjallajökull collection so far can be found here.

Volcanic lightning, Eyjafjallajökull, and how it works – theoretical astrophysicist Ethan Seigel explains volcanic lightning, with gorgeous pictures.

The Big Picture: Iceland’s disruptive volcano – stunning images from The Boston Globe. More Eyjafjallajökull images from the Globe here.

Daily Mail: Iceland volcano – some wonderful pictures that happen to have shown up in the pages of one of the world’s more disgusting newspapers.

Ignorant idiot sounds off on volcanic ash threat (1) – Simon Jenkins in The Guardian‘s reliably appalling Comment is Free section: what’s all the fuss about, it’s just ‘a volcano and a bit of dust’.

Ignorant idiot sounds off on volcanic ash threat (2) – Frank Furedi at the generally loathsome Spiked Online: ‘I claim no authority to say anything of value about the risks posed by volcanic ash clouds to flying aircraft’, he says, but surprisingly he does not then shut up.

Ignorant idiot sounds off on volcanic ash threat (3) – rambling buffoon Max Hastings in the vile Daily Mail, has the nerve to say expert atmospheric scientist Dr Grant Allen of Manchester University ‘hasn’t a clue’.*

Ignorant idiot sounds off on volcanic ash threat (4) – prize twit Christopher Booker roams his enclosure at the Telegraph, rattling the bars: ash crisis all a fuss about nothing, evil European plot, global warming is wrong, blah blah blah.#

Eyjafjallajökull Art Project – art inspired by the eruption (Claire Iris Schencke‘s work is great).

Iceland Volcano Mispronunciation Video – lots of US television people coming a cropper trying to say Eyjafjallajökull.

Cybercrooks befuddled by Icelandic volcano name – scareware merchants and scammers can’t latch on to the Eyjafjallajökull story, the name is just too hard for them.

Icelandic singer explains how to say Eyjafjallajökull – with the help of her trusty ukelele.*

The Volcanism Blog

Comments

1. george wohanka - 22 April 2010

You state, “Dr Erik Klemetti of the Eruptions blog deserves some kind of award for his tireless coverage of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption.” It is true he has done a great job.

I was surprised that you were actually able to add great value to the subject. You are very organized. The links and images, some of which I had not see are great.

2. admin - 22 April 2010

Thanks George – in this post I tried to feature links that I hadn’t seen elsewhere. I’ll add more as they come to my attention.

But yes, my hat’s off to Erik, he’s done a fantastic job and really shown what a great blog can do. Eruptions has been the go-to place on the web for Eyjafjallajökull.

3. Boris Behncke - 22 April 2010

Thanks for this little collection of precious gems. It gave me some of the best laughs I had in a while, especially the little Eyjafjallajökull pronounciation video. And while I agree with you on behalf of Erik’s enormous merits in this affair, I appreciate your efforts equally, and sometimes would wish to see more discussion here because you’re bringing up thought-provoking issues in a similar way. From the time it takes me to contribute my occasional input in the comments here and at Eruptions, I can faintly imagine the amount of time that must be consumed to do all the research to put together one single entry in this blog.

4. admin - 24 April 2010

Thank you Boris – I appreciate your appreciation! As for Eruptions, speaking for myself I go there for what Erik Klemetti has to say, and for the contributions of a select few of his regular commenters, mostly professionals like yourself. I’m not sure I would want those huge comment threads here: a very mixed blessing.


Sorry comments are closed for this entry