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NASA Earth Observatory: Soufrière Hills valleys and debris deposits 8 January 2010

Posted by admin in Caribbean, NASA Earth Observatory, Soufrière Hills.
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Soufriere Hills volcano resumes activity (NASA EO-1 image, 29 December 2009)

Image of the day for 7 January 2010 at the NASA Earth Observatory is this view of Soufrière Hills volcano on the Caribbean island of Montserrat, captured by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite on 29 December 2009.

The image clearly shows how the deposits from the debris flows radiating out from the summit of Soufrière Hills have descended the major drainage channels in the flanks of the volcano and filled them with volcanic deposits. North is to the right in this image; the prominent debris fan in the middle of the southern coast (on the left) is formed by volcanic material deposited by pyroclastic flows that have followed the channel of the White River Valley.

Soufriere Hills volcano resumes activity – NASA Earth Observatory, 7 January 2010

(To go off-topic for a moment, the NASA Earth Observatory image of the day for today is a Terra MODIS view of the green and pleasant land in which I happen to live.)

For all our Soufrière Hills coverage: Soufrière Hills « The Volcanism Blog.

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Soufrière Hills – information about Soufrière Hills volcano (1600-05=)
Montserrat Volcano Observatory – comprehensive news and information from the MVO

The Volcanism Blog

Comments

1. Chance Metz - 9 January 2010

Speaking of Soufriere Hiils, the volcano had a pretty big eruption/dome collapse a couple of hours ago to at least 25,000 feet.

FVXX20 KNES 082241
VA ADVISORY
DTG: 20100108/2241Z

VAAC: WASHINGTON

VOLCANO: SOUFRIERE HILLS 1600-05
PSN: N1642 W06210

AREA: W_INDIES

SUMMIT ELEV: 3002 FT (915 M)

ADVISORY NR: 2010/036

INFO SOURCE: GOES-12. GFS WINDS. NAM WINDS.
RADIOSONDE. MONTSERRAT OBSERVATORY. PIARCO MWO

ERUPTION DETAILS: ONGOING EMISSIONS

OBS VA DTG: 08/2145Z

OBS VA CLD: SFC/FL250 N1656 W06159 – N1656 W06146
– N1625 W06153 – N1614 W06216 – N1628 W06216 –
N1643 W06207 – N1656 W06159 MOV E 5-10KT
SFC/FL150 N1717 W06253 – N1717 W06234 – N1628
W06217 – N1614 W06216 – N1626 W06329 – N1654
W06328 – N1717 W06253 MOV W 25-30KT SFC/FL100
N1752 W06559 – N1701 W06318 – N1651 W06329 –
N1704 W06607 – N1752 W06559 MOV W 20-25KT

FCST VA CLD +6HR: 09/0400Z SFC/FL250 N1649 W06135
– N1634 W06113 – N1548 W06147 – N1607 W06207 –
N1649 W06135 SFC/FL150 N1743 W06401 – N1714
W06232 – N1622 W06246 – N1646 W06417 – N1743
W06401

FCST VA CLD +12HR: 09/1000Z SFC/FL150 N1820
W06459 – N1738 W06344 – N1648 W06405 – N1720
W06527 – N1820 W06459 SFC/FL250 N1628 W06216 –
N1611 W06137 – N1528 W06159 – N1545 W06244 –
N1628 W06216

FCST VA CLD +18HR: 09/1600Z SFC/FL150 N1831
W06537 – N1745 W06407 – N1652 W06449 – N1731
W06609 – N1831 W06537 SFC/FL250 N1607 W06243 –
N1541 W06153 – N1502 W06228 – N1549 W06329 –
N1607 W06243

RMK: MVO AND MODEL WINDS INDICATE ASH IS AT A
MAXIMUM OF FL250 EAST OF THE VOLCANO WITH ASH AT
FL100-150 TO THE WEST. FORECAST HAS LOW
CONFIDENCE AS SHIFTING WINDS ARE INDICATED.
…SCHWARTZ

NXT ADVISORY: WILL BE ISSUED BY 20100109/0445Z

2. Chance Metz - 9 January 2010

This is from the MVO regarding the explosive event. it seems to have been a very big event with very exxtensive pyroclastic flows produced.

Explosion sends pyroclastic flows down Belham Valley
At 2:49 pm on Friday 8th January 2010 a large pyroclastic flow forming event occurred at Soufriere Hills volcano. A collapsing fountain of tephra, associated with ballistic fragments, was observed at the start of the event on the northeastern side of the volcano (very similar in character to those which occurred in Summer 1997). Large pyroclastic flows moved both to the northeast, down towards the old airport, to the northwest down Tyers Ghaut, and into the Belham Valley. These flows reached as far as approximately 300 m upstream of the Belham crossing. Pyroclastic flows also moved to the west towards Plymouth, although it is presently unclear whether they actually reached the sea. The event lasted about 11 minutes and seismicity returned to background levels rapidly. There was no precursory seismicity associated with the event. Only ashfall has been reported in inhabited areas on the northwestern side of the volcano.


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