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Chaitén imagery at the NASA Earth Observatory 26 October 2009

Posted by admin in Chaitén, Chile, NASA Earth Observatory.
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Chaiten volcano, 20 October 2009 (NASA EO-1 image)

The NASA Earth Observatory is showcasing a new image of Chaitén volcano in Chile, captured on 20 October 2009 the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. A reduced-size preview is shown above: Chaitén volcano, marked with the yellow arrow, is producing a white plume that turns to the north-east. Chaitén town, inundated by lahars that have descended the Chaitén river valley from the volcano, can be seen in the lower left of the image. The snow-covered mass on the upper right is Minchinmávida volcano.

The Earth Observatory offers a detail view of Chaitén volcano with labels and an explanatory caption and the full-size version of the image (3 MB, 3000 x 3000 pixels), which shows lots of fascinating detail.

Chaitén volcano, Chile – NASA Earth Observatory (26 October 2009)

[NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team.]

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Soufrière Hills astronaut photograph at the NASA Earth Observatory 17 October 2009

Posted by admin in Caribbean, NASA Earth Observatory, Soufrière Hills.
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Ash and Steam Plume, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat - detail (ISS astronaut photograph, 11 October 2009)

Yet another great picture of the current Soufrière Hills activity at the NASA Earth Observatory. This time it’s an ISS astronaut photograph (detail above) showing the entire island of Montserrat, with Soufrière Hills volcano producing a vigorous plume, captured on 11 October 2009. Visit the Earth Observatory for the full picture:

Ash and steam plume, Soufrière Hills volcano – NASA Earth Observatory (16 October 2009)

[Astronaut photograph ISS021-E-5555 acquired 11 October 2009 by the Expedition 21 crew, International Space Station Program.]

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Soufrière Hills at the NASA Earth Observatory 13 October 2009

Posted by admin in Caribbean, eruptions, NASA Earth Observatory, Soufrière Hills.
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Soufriere Hills volcano continues activity, 12 October 2009 (NASA MODIS image)

The NASA Earth Observatory has another great satellite image of Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat releasing an ash plume during its current burst of activity. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image on 12 October 2009.

Soufriere Hills volcano continues activity – NASA Earth Observatory (13 October 2009)

[NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.]

For all our Soufrière Hills coverage: Soufrière Hills « The Volcanism Blog.

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NASA Earth Observatory: activity at Shiveluch 6 October 2009

Posted by admin in Kamchatka, NASA Earth Observatory, Russia, Shiveluch.
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Activity at Shiveluch volcano, 3 October 2009 (NASA MODIS image)

The NASA Earth Observatory have published a new image of Shiveluch volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula, captured on 3 October 2009 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. The image shows a diffuse plume dispersing to the south-east. To the south-west of Shiveluch lies Kliuchevskoi volcano, which has also been active lately, although at the time this picture was taken it seems to have been going through a quiet interlude.

Activity at Shiveluch Volcano – NASA Earth Observatory (6 October 2009)

[NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center.]

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Chaitén lava domes at the NASA Earth Observatory 2 October 2009

Posted by admin in Chaitén, Chile, eruptions, NASA Earth Observatory.
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Lava domes, Chaiten volcano, 30 September 2009 (NASA EO-1 ALI image, courtesy NASA Earth Observatory)

Hot on the heels of the last Chaitén image featured by the NASA Earth Observatory comes this close-up view of the Chaitén lava domes, captured by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite on 30 September 2009. In this new image the plume is blowing away to the south, revealing the northern part of the dome complex which was obscured in the earlier image (detail shown below).

Chaiten volcano erupting, 27 September 2009 (NASA EO-1 ALI image, courtesy NASA Earth Observatory)

[NASA images by Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team. Thanks to Robert Simmon of the NASA Earth Observatory for referencing this blog in his caption.]

Lava domes, Chaitén volcano – NASA Earth Observatory (2 October 2009)

For all our Chaitén coverage: Chaitén « The Volcanism Blog.

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The eruption of Chaitén, at the NASA Earth Observatory 28 September 2009

Posted by admin in activity reports, Chaitén, Chile, eruptions, NASA Earth Observatory.
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Ash and Steam Plume from Chaitén, 27 September 2009 (NASA EO-1 ALI image, courtesy NASA Earth Observatory)

There is a wonderful new image of the ongoing eruption of Chaitén volcano at the NASA Earth Observatory website today. This natural colour image (reduced size version above) was captured by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard the NASA/USGS Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite on 27 September 2009. The full image (2 MB, 2683 x 2683 pixels) from which the reduced picture above is a detail is quite magnificent:

Ash and Steam Plume from Chaitén, 27 September 2009 (NASA EO-1 ALI image, courtesy NASA Earth Observatory) - large image

The detail below taken from the large image shows the caldera, which is now almost entirely filled by the constantly-growing lava dome. The area of active growth can be seen in the west (towards the left of the image); this area is steaming vigorously, and the very steep slopes of the dome complex can clearly be seen, particularly towards the south. These steep slopes are unstable, producing constant rockfalls. A large-scale collapse here would send debris flows down the valley of the Chaitén river towards the town of Chaitén, 10 km south of the volcano.

Chaiten volcano erupting, 27 September 2009 (NASA EO-1 ALI image, courtesy NASA Earth Observatory)

A further detail view shows the town of Chaitén, engulfed in volcanic deposits which have descended the Chaitén river valley from the volcano in the form of volcanic mudflows or lahars. A fan-shaped bank of accumulated volcanic sediment, washed out of the river estuary, cuts the town’s harbour off from the sea.

Chaiten town, 27 September 2009 (NASA EO-1 ALI image, courtesy NASA Earth Observatory)

[NASA image by Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team. Thanks to Robert Simmon of the NASA Earth Observatory for giving the Volcanism Blog a preview of this image, and for referencing this blog in his caption.]

Ash and steam plume from Chaitén – NASA Earth Observatory (28 September 2009)

For all our Chaitén coverage: Chaitén « The Volcanism Blog.

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Ol Doinyo Lengai at the NASA Earth Observatory 17 September 2009

Posted by admin in Africa, NASA Earth Observatory, Ol Doinyo Lengai, Tanzania.
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Ol Doinyo Lengai - left: 16 July 2004, right: 12 September 2009 (NASA imagery)

The NASA Earth Observatory has just published some particularly fascinating volcano imagery in its ‘natural hazards’ category: satellite images of the remarkable Tanzanian volcano Ol Doinyo Lengai, showing the changes that have occurred at the summit of the volcano following the explosive eruptions of 2007-8. The Earth Observatory has showcased two images, one from July 2004 (detail on the left, above) and the other from September 2009 (on the right). Ol Doinyo Lengai is unique on Earth because of its low-temperature natrocarbonatite lavas.

Changes on Ol Doinyo Lengai – NASA Earth Observatory, 16 September 2009

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Black Point Lava Flow, Arizona, at the NASA Earth Observatory 8 September 2009

Posted by admin in NASA Earth Observatory.
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Black Point Lava Flow, Arizona (ISS astronaut photograph, 21 August 2009)

NASA Earth Observatory Image of the Day for 7 September 2009 is this astronaut photograph of the Black Point Lava Flow, taken from the International Space Station on 21 August 2009. The flow is part of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona, which lies between Flagstaff and the Grand Canyon. The flow has created a landscape of such unearthliness that NASA uses it for lunar astronaut training. For the original image and more information:

Black Point Lava Flow, Arizona – NASA Earth Observatory (7 September 2009)

[Astronaut photograph ISS020-E-33530 acquired 21 August 2009 by the Expedition 20 crew, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.]

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Koryaksky at the NASA Earth Observatory 27 August 2009

Posted by admin in Kamchatka, Koryaksky, NASA Earth Observatory, Russia, volcanoes.
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Koryaksky at the NASA Earth Observatory

Russian volcano Koryaksky on the Kamchatka peninsula has been active recently, along with quite a few of its fellow Kamchatkan volcanoes. Earlier today NASA’s Aqua satellite passed overhead and its Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captured Koryaksky volcano producing a diffuse white plume which blows away to the east. The resulting image can be found at the NASA Earth Observatory.

The city of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (population 200,000) is overlooked by Koryaksky and Avachinsky volcanoes, both highly active – the image above shows clearly just how close Koryaksky is to the city. Koryaksky has been designated a Decade Volcano jointly with Avachinsky because of its history of explosive eruptions and its proximity to populated areas.

Activity at Koryaksky volcano – NASA Earth Observatory (27 August 2009)

[Thanks to the Earth Observatory team for crediting this blog as a source of information in their post.]

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Koryaksky – information about Koryaksky (1000-09=)
KVERT: current volcanic activity – current activity for the Kamchatkan volcanoes (English)
Current activity of Koryaksky volcano – current status of Koryaksky and many images (Russian and English)

The Volcanism Blog

Manam at the NASA Earth Observatory 11 July 2009

Posted by admin in Manam, NASA Earth Observatory, natural hazards, Papua New Guinea.
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Image of the Day for 10 July 2009 is this view of Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea, captured on 28 June 2009 by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on the NASA Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite:

Manam volcano, Papua New Guinea, 28 June 2009 (NASA EO-1 image)

Manam, an 1807-metre stratovolcano, is one of the most active volcanoes in Papua New Guinea. Prominent in this picture are the valleys that radiate from the volcano’s summit, which channel lava and pyroclastic flows towards the coast. There are two craters at the summit, of which the southernmost has been the most historically active, directing most of its eruptive products down the south-eastern valley (lower right in the NASA image). The undated picture below, from the Global Volcanism Program (the credit is to Wally Johnson, Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources) shows the south-eastern valley incised deeply into the vegetated lower flanks of the volcano:

Manam: south-eastern avalanche valley (Wally Johnson, Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources)

The island may look small but more than 9000 people originally lived there. They were evacuated when the current eruption of the volcano began in October 2004 – for a very interesting article on the evacuation and its lingering consequences, see ‘The Social Ramifications of Volcanism’ at Dr Erik Klemetti’s Eruptions blog.

[NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 Team.]

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