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Smithsonian/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 28 March to 3 April 2012 5 April 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Alaska, Caribbean, Chile, Cleveland, Colombia, Ecuador, Etna, Fuego, Guatemala, Hawaii, Iliamna, Indonesia, Italy, Kamchatka, Karymsky, Kilauea, Lewotobi, Mexico, Nevado del Ruiz, Popocatépetl, Puyehue, Russia, Shiveluch, Soufrière Hills, Sundoro, Tengger Caldera, Tungurahua, United States, Weekly Volcanic Activity Reports.
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The latest Smithsonian Institution and United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report has been published by the Global Volcanism Program, covering the week 28 March to 3 April 2012. The report is compiled by Sally Kuhn Sennert. Among the highlights of this week:

  • Alert level at Clevelandraised as a new lava dome becomes evident
  • A significant increase in seismicity at Nevado del Ruiz brings a rise in the alert level
  • High levels of sulphur dioxide emissions at Soufrière Hills
  • Another paroxysmal eruptive episode at Etna with lava fountaining and ashfall

SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 28 March to 3 April 2012

Click on the map for a larger version (1211 x 784 pixels).

The Smithsonian Institution/United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report for 28 March to 3 April 2012 is now available on the Global Volcanism Program website. The following is a summary and not a substitute for the full report.

New activity/unrest: Cleveland (Alaska, USA), Fuego (Guatemala), Iliamna (Alaska, USA), Lewotobi (Indonesia), Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia), Soufrière Hills (Montserrat), Sundoro (Indonesia).

Ongoing activity: Etna (Italy), Karymsky (Russia), Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Popocatépetl (Mexico), Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile), Shiveluch (Russia), Tengger Caldera (Indonesia), Tungurahua (Ecuador).

Note: ‘a.s.l.’ = ‘above sea level’.

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Smithsonian/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 14-20 March 2012 22 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Caribbean, Chile, Cleveland, Colombia, Ecuador, Etna, Hawaii, Iliamna, Italy, Japan, Kamchatka, Karymsky, Kilauea, Kizimen, Mexico, Nevado del Ruiz, Popocatépetl, Puyehue, Russia, Sakura-jima, Shishaldin, Soufrière Hills, Tungurahua, United States, Villarrica, Weekly Volcanic Activity Reports.
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The latest Smithsonian Institution and United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report has been published by the Global Volcanism Program, covering the week 14-20 March 2012. The report is compiled by Sally Kuhn Sennert. Among the highlights of this week:

  • A plume, probably water vapour, seen from Iliamna, where seismicity remained elevated
  • Seismicity decreased at Nevado del Ruiz but significant gas emissions continued
  • Etna continued lively with lava flows and fountaining, and strong ash emission
  • Daily explosions at Shiveluch produced plumes which reached 3-5 km altitude

SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 14-20 March 2012

Click on the map for a larger version (1211 x 784 pixels).

The Smithsonian Institution/United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report for 14-20 March 2012 is now available on the Global Volcanism Program website. The following is a summary and not a substitute for the full report.

New activity/unrest: Iliamna (Alaska, USA), Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia).

Ongoing activity: Cleveland (Alaska, USA), Etna (Italy), Karymsky (Russia), Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Kizimen (Russia), Popocatépetl (Mexico, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile), Sakura-jima (Japan), Shiveluch (Russia), Soufrière Hills (Montserrat), Tungurahua (Ecuador), Villarrica (Chile).

Note: ‘a.s.l.’ = ‘above sea level’.

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Smithsonian/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 7-13 March 2012 15 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Alaska, Bezymianny, Chile, Cleveland, Colombia, eruptions, Hawaii, Ijen, Iliamna, Indonesia, Japan, Kamchatka, Karymsky, Kilauea, Kizimen, Lamongan, Marapi, Nevado del Ruiz, Puyehue, Russia, Sakura-jima, Santa María, Shiveluch, Tungurahua, United States, Villarrica, Weekly Volcanic Activity Reports.
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The latest Smithsonian Institution and United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report has been published by the Global Volcanism Program, covering the week 7-13 March 2012. The report is compiled by Sally Kuhn Sennert. Some of the news from a week that has seen quite a lot of new activity:

  • An explosive eruption at Bezymianny sent ash up to 8 km altitude
  • Activity at Nevado del Ruiz marked by explosions, ash emissions and increased seismicity
  • Cleveland stirs with small explosive eruptions
  • Explosions at Santa María produce localized ashfall

SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 7-13 March 2012

Click on the map for a larger version (1211 x 784 pixels).

The Smithsonian Institution/United States Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report for 7-13 March 2012 is now available on the Global Volcanism Program website. The following is a summary and not a substitute for the full report.

New activity/unrest: Bezymianny (Russia), Cleveland (Alaska, USA), Ijen (Indonesia), Iliamna (Alaska, USA), Lamongan (Indonesia), Marapi (Indonesia), Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia), Tungurahua (Ecuador).

Ongoing activity: Karymsky (Russia), Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Kizimen (Russia), Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile), Sakura-jima (Japan), Santa María (Guatemala), Shiveluch (Russia), Villarrica (Chile).

Note: ‘a.s.l.’ = ‘above sea level’.

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Cleveland, Alaska: another small explosion 15 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Alaska, Cleveland, eruptions, Iliamna, United States.
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Cleveland volcano in the Aleutians had another small eruption on the afternoon of 13 March, reports the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the third such event in a week (the previous eruptions were on 7 March and 10 March). The AVO status report, issued on 14 March at 1134 local time (1934Z) describes what happened:

Yesterday afternoon at approximately 2:55 pm AKDT (22:55 UTC), AVO infrasound and seismic networks detected a small explosion at Cleveland. Clouds prevented a clear view of the volcano at the time of the explosion, however, ash was not observed rising through the cloud deck suggesting relatively minor ash emission.

The Volcano Alert Level for Cleveland remains at Watch, the Aviation Colour Code at Orange. The same report notes that seismicity remains elevated at Iliamna volcano (which remains at Yellow/Advisory).

News
Cleveland volcano explodes for the third time – alaskapublic.org, 14 March 2012

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Cleveland – summary information for Cleveland (1101-24-)
Global Volcanism Program: Iliamna – summary information for Iliamna (1103-02-)
AVO Cleveland Activity Page – information on current activity at Cleveland
AVO Iliamna Activity Page – information on current activity at Iliamna
Alaska Volcano Observatory – AVO main page

The Volcanism Blog

Santorini shows signs of restlessness 14 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Greece, Santorini.
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Santorini: ASTER/Terra image, 21 November 2000 (NASA)The almost unbelievable beauty and visual drama of the Greek island group known as Santorini in the southern Aegean Sea is the result of a complex geological history. Santorini is the site of several shield volcanoes which overlap and are cut by a number of calderas created by successive very large explosive eruptions (180,000 years ago, 70,000 years ago, 21,000 years ago and 3,600 years ago). The most recent large eruption around 1650 BC was one of the most powerful of Holocene volcanic eruptions, with a VEI normally rated as 6 or 7. This eruption has been associated with the destruction of the Minoan civilization in nearby Crete, and certainly had a destructive impact across an extensive area of the eastern Mediterranean. Since that most recent caldera collapse event Santorini has periodically reminded everyone that it is still active, with smaller-scale (but locally destructive) eruptions in 1570, 1650, 1707 and 1866, generally involving submarine activity with dome extrusion, island formation, lava flows and phreatic explosions. During the twentieth century there was activity in 1925, 1928, 1939 and 1950. The site of recent activity has been Nea Kameni, which can be seen in the centre of the island group in the image above, which dates from 21 November 2000 and comes from the NASA Earth Observatory.

Santorini, then, is very much an active volcano, and there are currently indications that it is becoming restless once again. A team led by Dr Andrew Newman of Georgia Tech has been monitoring Santorini through a dense network of GPS stations since 2006. Over the past year, since January 2011, these instruments have detected a reawakening of the volcano. Newman’s team has published their observations in Geophysical Research Letters (papers in press). To quote from the abstract:

After approximately 60 years of seismic quiescence within Santorini caldera, in January 2011 the volcano reawakened with a significant seismic swarm and rapidly expanding radial deformation. The deformation is imaged by a dense network of 19 survey and 5 continuous GPS stations, showing that as of 21 January 2012, the volcano has extended laterally from a point inside the northern segment of the caldera by about 140 mm and is expanding at 180 mm/yr. A series of spherical source models show the source is not migrating significantly, but remains about 4 km depth and has expanded by 14 million m3 since inflation began.

An injection of fresh magma is clearly going on at depth. This may not produce eruptive activity at the surface at all (Professor Newman points out that other calderas around the world have shown comparable activity without erupting), but Santorini, a volcano with the potential to be very dangerous, is evidently getting restless once again.

  • A. V. V. Newman, S. Stiros, L. Feng, P. Psimoulis, F. Moschas, V. Saltogianni, Y. Jiang, C. Papazachos, D. G. Panagiotopoulos, E. Karagianni, & D. Vamvakaris, ‘Recent geodetic unrest at Santorini Caldera, Greece’, Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2012GL051286, in press (accepted 6 March 2012). [abstract]

News
Santorini: the ground is moving again in paradise – Georgia Tech news release, 13 March 2012 (duly recycled at ScienceDaily, esciencenews and probably elsewhere too)
Volcanic island of Santorini shows activityGreek Reporter, 13 March 2012
Volcanic activity detected on Greek island – TG Daily, 14 March 2012
Volcano on scenic Greek island getting a little restless – msnbc.com, 14 March 2012
Greek volcano reawakensScienceNews, 14 March 2012

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Santorini – GVP information for Santorini (0102-04=)
ISMOSAV – Institute for the Study and Monitoring of the Santorini Volcano
Santorini Decade Volcano – Santorini profile from the Decade Volcanoes project

The Volcanism Blog

Alert level raised at Ijen, Indonesia 13 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Ijen, Indonesia.
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VolcanoDiscovery reports that the alert level for Ijen volcano in eastern Java, Indonesia, has been raised to level 3, ‘alert’ (the second-highest level) because of an increase in activity. Ijen’s alert level was last raised to 3 in December 2011, but was lowered to 2 in February. Concern about increased seismicity and degassing led Indonesia’s geological and hazard mitigation authority, PVMBG, to raise the level to 3 again on 12 March.

[H/T: VolcanoDiscovery.]

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Ijen – summary information for Ijen (0603-35=)

The Volcanism Blog

Sakura-jima: eruptive activity increases 13 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, eruptions, Japan, Sakura-jima.
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Situated in the south of Kyushu, the southernmost of the four main islands making up the Japanese archipelago, Sakura-jima is one of the world’s most active volcanoes. The Global Volcanism Program records Sakura-jima’s current eruption as having begun in October 1955, so it has now been on the go continuously for more than half a century.

Over the past couple of weeks Sakura-jima has shown an increase in the level of its activity, with ash explosions increasing in size and frequency. Yesterday there was a sizeable explosion which the Japan Meteorological Agency classed as the most powerful since 2009 (‘Foot-wide rocks were expulsed over a mile away’ reports the Daily Telegraph, incoherent with excitement), and today the activity has continued with violent explosions, lava fountaining, and pyroclastic material being ‘expulsed’ up to 2 km altitude.

News
Volcano erupts violently in JapanDaily Telegraph, 13 March 2012 (video)
Moment volcano erupted in Japan – BBC News, 13 March 2012 (video)

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Sakura-jima – summary information for Sakura-jima (0802-08=)

The Volcanism Blog

Alaska: another small explosion at Cleveland 11 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Alaska, Cleveland, eruptions, Iliamna, United States.
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The Alaska Volcano Observatory reports another small explosive event at Cleveland volcano, following the small explosion detected on 7 March. This one happened in the afternoon (local time) of 9 March, as the AVO Volcanic Activity Notification reports:

Another small, short duration explosion from Cleveland Volcano was detected on distant seismic stations and infrasound arrays on about 1:55 March 10, UTC (4:05 PM March 9, AKST.) No ash cloud from this event was detected in satellite imagery probably due to cloudy weather conditions. This explosion was similar to recent small events that occurred on March 7 and in December 2011. These events produced small ash clouds that dissipated quickly and did not affect air traffic.

The Volcano Alert Level for Cleveland remains at Watch, the Aviation Colour Code at Orange. The same report gives an update on Iliamna, where seismic activity remains above background. Iliamna’s alert status is currently one notch below Cleveland’s, at Volcano Alert Level Advisory, Aviation Colour Code Yellow.

News
Cleveland volcano rocked by explosionAnchorage Daily News, 10 March 2012.

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Cleveland – summary information for Cleveland (1101-24-)
Global Volcanism Program: Iliamna – summary information for Iliamna (1103-02-)
AVO Cleveland Activity Page – information on current activity at Cleveland
AVO Iliamna Activity Page – information on current activity at Iliamna
Alaska Volcano Observatory – AVO main page

The Volcanism Blog

Alert level raised at Iliamna volcano, Alaska 10 March 2012

Posted by admin in activity reports, Alaska, Iliamna, United States.
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Increased seismic activity has been evident at Iliamna volcano in Alaska since late last year. The Alaska Volcano Observatory has been watching Iliamna closely, and has decided that the elevated activity is significant enough to merit an increase in the volcano’s alert level. The new status of Iliamna is Advisory/Yellow. The AVO volcanic activity notice reads as follows:

Over the past three months the earthquake rate at Iliamna Volcano has steadily increased and now exceeds normal background levels. Although it is not certain that this sustained increase in earthquake activity represents the movement of magma at depth, it is a significant change and AVO has increased the Alert Level to Advisory and the Aviation Color Code to Yellow. The current activity does not mean an eruption is imminent or certain. A similarly energetic episode of seismic unrest from September 1996 to February 1997 was likely related to the intrusion of new magma at depth, but an eruption did not occur.

Iliamna has a real-time seismic network, and AVO will continue to monitor the volcano’s activity closely.

News
Alert level raised for Alaska volcano – WKYC, 9 March 2012
Alert level raised for Alaska’s Iliamna volcanoAlaska Dispatch, 9 March 2012
Increased seismic activity prompts alert level change for Alaska volcanoWashington Post, 9 March 2012

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Iliamna – summary information for Iliamna (1103-02-)
AVO Iliamna activity page – AVO page for Iliamna activity
Alaska Volcano Observatory – AVO main page

The Volcanism Blog

Puyehue Cordón Caulle at the NASA Earth Observatory 9 March 2012

Posted by admin in Chile, NASA Earth Observatory, natural hazards, Puyehue.
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The eruption under way at the Puyehue Cordón Caulle volcanic complex in Chile, which began in June 2011 and which caused large-scale evacuations and much disruption last year, may yet reach its first anniversary but appears to be waning. The NASA Earth Observatory has published images of the volcano captured in February and March 2012 which show a small diffuse plume, much reduced from the voluminous ashy emissions that were causing so many difficulties across South America and further afield last year. Click on the image below (MODIS/Terra image, 7 March 2012) to go to the article at the NASA Earth Observatory.

Puyehue Cordon Caulle, 7 March 2012 (NASA MODIS/Terra image).

As the Earth Observatory article points out, although ash levels are much reduced the legacy of Puyehue’s emissions remains for the local environment, with vegetation killed and lakes coated in floating particulates. An article at the Nature News Blog discusses some of the effects of the eruption on regional ecosystems. Recovery will of course occur, as the article recognizes, ending with the confident prediction by an Argentinian scientist that ‘the ecosystems will recover in due course’. Indeed, it is somewhat anthropocentric to talk, as the Nature News article does, of volcanic ash ‘disrupting’ local ecosystems when volcanoes are themselves a part of those systems.

Puyehue-Cordón Caulle – NASA Earth Observatory, 9 March 2012
Chilean volcano’s ash is still disrupting ecosystems – Nature News Blog, 22 February 2012

The Volcanism Blog

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