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Eyjafjallajökull/Fimmvörðuhálsi eruption: another satellite image at the NASA Earth Observatory 30 March 2010

Posted by admin in activity reports, eruptions, Eyjafjöll, Iceland, NASA Earth Observatory, volcanoes.
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Eruption of Eyjafjallajokull Volcano, Iceland, 26 March 2010 (NASA Earth Observatory)

Hot on the heels of the Advanced Land Imager’s view of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption showcased by the NASA Earth Observatory a few days ago comes this MODIS image captured by the Terra satellite on 26 March 2010 which shows very clearly the location of the current activity at Fimmvörduháls, between the two icecaps of Eyjafjallajökull (west) and Mýrdalsjökull (east). It is fortunate that the eruption is between the icecaps and not beneath them: a subglacial eruption would threaten to unleash a meltwater flood or jökulhlaup.

Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland – NASA Earth Observatory, 29 March 2010

Meanwhile, the Fimmvörduháls webcam operated by Icelandic telecomms company Míla is providing great close-up images of the eruption once again. Vigorous fire fountain activity is visible even in daylight. This view was captured at 18:28 GMT this evening:

Eyjafjallajokull fra Fimmvorduhalsi 2010-03-30

For all our Eyjafjallajökull coverage: Eyjafjöll « The Volcanism Blog.

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Eyjafjöll – summary information for Eyjafjallajökull, which the GVP calls Eyjafjöll (1702-02=)
Eyjafjallajökull eruption March 2010 – summary of events from the University of Iceland’s Nordic Volcanological Center
Photos from Fimmvörðuháls – images and information from the Iceland Meteorological Office

The Volcanism Blog

NASA Earth Observatory: cool flows at Llullaillaco 29 March 2010

Posted by admin in Argentina, Chile, Llullaillaco, NASA Earth Observatory, volcanoes.
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Llullaillaco volcano, Argentina-Chile border (ISS astronaut photograph, 9 Dec 2009)

The latest image of the day at the NASA Earth Observatory is this astronaut photograph of Llullaillaco volcano, which is situated on the Argentina/Chile border. Llullaillaco is the highest historically active volcano in the world, 6739 metres high, and last erupted in the nineteenth century. The lava flow extending to the north of the volcano shows very clearly features typical of a viscous flow on a steep slope. Lava at the edges of the flow has cooled more rapidly than that in the centre to produce the walled channel effect of a flow levée, while the faster cooling of the upper surface of the lobe at the front of the flow has produced characteristic layering and pressure ridges at 90 degrees to the direction of the flow. The Earth Observatory caption refers to the lobes of this flow as coulées (but this is what I call a coulée).

It’s also interesting to note, given the time of year, that the head of the Easter Bunny is clearly visible between the two lobes of the lava flow in the top right of the image:

The Llullaillaco Easter Bunny

[Astronaut photograph ISS022-E-8285 was acquired on December 9, 2009, with a Nikon D2Xs digital camera using an 800mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 22 crew.]

Llullaillaco volcano, Argentina-Chile border – NASA Earth Observatory, 29 March 2010

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Eyjafjallajökull/Fimmvörduháls at the NASA Earth Observatory 27 March 2010

Posted by admin in activity reports, eruptions, Eyjafjöll, Iceland, NASA Earth Observatory.
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As previewed here (and at Eruptions) yesterday, the NASA Earth Observatory image of the day for 27 March 2010 is the ongoing fissure eruption at Eyjafjallajökull/Fimmvörduháls in south Iceland.

Eruption of Eyjafjallajokull Volcano, Iceland, 24 March 2010 (NASA Earth Observatory)

A commenter here asked about the green colour visible within the fissure and the drainage channel in this image. Robert Simmon of NASA answers that question in the Eruptions comments thread: ‘The green along the margin of the lava flow is an artifact of the satellite sensor. The true-color image is the combination of a 30m/pixel RGB image with a 10m/pixel panchromatic image. Each color pixels covers the same area as 9 panchromatic pixels, so you’ll occasionally get odd colors in high contrast areas’.

Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland – NASA Earth Observatory, 27 March 2010

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Eyjafjöll – summary information for Eyjafjallajökull, which the GVP calls Eyjafjöll (1702-02=)
Eyjafjallajökull eruption March 2010 – summary of events from the University of Iceland’s Nordic Volcanological Center
Photos from Fimmvörðuháls – images and information from the Iceland Meteorological Office

The Volcanism Blog

NASA Earth Observatory: Chaitén volcano and surrounding area 1 March 2010

Posted by admin in Chaitén, Chile, NASA Earth Observatory.
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Chaiten volcano and surrounding area (NASA Aqua MODIS image, 25 February 2010)

At the NASA Earth Observatory a new natural colour image of Chile’s Chaitén volcano and the surrounding area has been published in the Natural Hazards category. Captured on 25 February 2010 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite, the image shows the large area of recent grey ash deposits around Chaitén volcano and the ash-choked rivers draining the area. The site of Chaitén town, dangerous and officially abandoned but still, apparently, a tourist magnet, can be seen at the mouth of the river to the south of the volcano.

Chaitén volcano and the surrounding area – NASA Earth Observatory, 26 February 2010

For all our Chaitén coverage: Chaitén « The Volcanism Blog.

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Soufrière Hills images at NASA Earth Observatory: before and after the dome collapse 24 February 2010

Posted by admin in Caribbean, eruptions, NASA Earth Observatory, Soufrière Hills.
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Soufriere Hills, Montserrat. Left: 17 March 2007. Right: 21 February 2010. (NASA images)

The NASA Earth Observatory has published two satellite images of Montserrat, one showing the island in March 2007 before the Soufrière Hills lava dome collapse of 11 February 2010, and one captured ten days after that event. The two images make a fascinating comparison: a much-reduced side-by-side version is shown above. The March 2007 image is on the left, the February 2010 image on the right. A great deal of fresh ashfall can be seen, and the extensive pyroclastic flow deposits north-east of the volcano (extending the coastline by 650 metres according to MVO reports) are clearly visible.

Soufriere Hills volcano resumes activity – NASA Earth Observatory, 21 February 2010

For all our Soufrière Hills coverage: Soufrière Hills « The Volcanism Blog.

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Simultaneous Kamchatka volcanic eruptions at the NASA Earth Observatory 19 February 2010

Posted by admin in Bezymianny, Kamchatka, Kliuchevskoi, NASA Earth Observatory, Russia.
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Bezymianny (bottom) and Kliuchevskoi (top) erupting simultaneously, 13 February 2010 (NASA ASTER image)

The NASA Earth Observatory is currently showcasing a stunning image – two volcanoes erupting simultaneously on the far-eastern Russian peninsula of Kamchatka. The two are Bezmianny (bottom) and Kliuchevskoi (top). This false-colour image was captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite on 13 February 2010.

Volcanoes erupt simultaneously on Kamchatka – NASA Earth Observatory, 18 February 2010

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The Soufrière Hills dome collapse of 11 February 2010 from space 15 February 2010

Posted by admin in activity reports, Caribbean, eruptions, NASA Earth Observatory, Soufrière Hills.
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UPDATE 16 February 2010. The image of Soufrière Hills discussed below is today’s Image of the Day at the NASA Earth Observatory.

Many thanks to Robert Simmon of the NASA Earth Observatory who forwarded this image (other versions at various pixel sizes available at NASA’s Rapid Response site) of the Lesser Antilles captured by the MODIS aboard NASA’s Terra satellite at 17:20 UTC on 11 February 2010 – just in time to catch the dome collapse event of that day at Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat. A cropped and labelled version of the image is below.

Soufriere Hills, 11 February 2010 (NASA Aqua MODIS image)

The dense, ashy plume thrown up by the dome collapse is clearly visible, piling up over Montserrat and trending to the east. The event began at about 17:00 UTC according to Washington VAAC, so when this image was captured the plume had not yet made its way far across the ocean. Subsequently ashfall from this event occurred to the south-east, in Guadeloupe and Dominica, and in Martinique, St Lucia and Barbados. The ash caused extensive disruption including flight cancellations. Ash from earlier activity can be seen floating on the surface of the sea to the north and east of Montserrat, producing a faint grey-green stain.

For all our Soufrière Hills coverage: Soufrière Hills « The Volcanism Blog.

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Soufrière Hills – information about Soufrière Hills volcano (1600-05=)
Montserrat Volcano Observatory – the MVO’s information-rich website

The Volcanism Blog

Fukutoku-Okanoba at the NASA Earth Observatory 12 February 2010

Posted by admin in Fukutoku-Okanoba, Japan, NASA Earth Observatory.
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Submarine Volcano Fukutoku-Okanoba Erupts (NASA Terra image, 9 February 2010)

Undersea volcano Fukutoku-Okanoba in the Japanese Volcano Islands erupted a few days ago, producing steam and ash, and discolouring the surrounding water. The NASA Earth Observatory has two nice images of this event captured on 9 and 11 February 2010. The first (detail above) was captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite on 9 February 2010, while the second (detail below) comes from the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite and was captured on 11 February 2010.

Submarine Volcano Fukutoku-Okanoba Erupts (NASA EO-1 image, 11 February 2010)

(Thanks to the NASA Earth Observatory team for citing this blog as a source.)

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Fukutoku-Okanoba – information from the GVP about Fukutoku-Okanoba (0804-13=)

The Volcanism Blog

New Soufrière Hills image at the NASA Earth Observatory 5 February 2010

Posted by admin in Caribbean, NASA Earth Observatory, Soufrière Hills.
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Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, 31 January 2010 (NASA Aqua MODIS image)

NASA’s Earth Observatory has been following the Soufrière Hills eruption with a great collection of fascinating images since the volcano saw a resurgence of activity in the autumn of 2009. The latest image is a crystal-clear shot from the MODIS aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite, captured on 31 January 2010 (detail above), showing the light-grey ash cloud produced by the active Soufrière Hills lava dome swirling around Montserrat to the north and west. Recent activity has seen most of the island affected by ashfall, according to reports from the Montserrat Volcano Observatory.

Soufriere Hills volcano continues activity – NASA Earth Observatory, 2 February 2010

For all our Soufrière Hills coverage: Soufrière Hills « The Volcanism Blog.

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Soufrière Hills – information about Soufrière Hills volcano (1600-05=)
Montserrat Volcano Observatory – comprehensive news and information from the MVO

The Volcanism Blog

Unrest at Turrialba: new NASA image, and an overflight 27 January 2010

Posted by admin in activity reports, Costa Rica, NASA Earth Observatory, Turrialba, volcanoes.
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Unrest at Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica, 21 January 2010 (NASA EO-1 ALI image)

The image above, from the NASA Earth Observatory, shows ongoing activity at Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica, captured by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite on 21 January 2010. The damage caused to vegetation to the west of the volcano’s summit by acidic gas emissions is clearly visible. Hazy grey-blue fumes can be seen drifting north from the active summit crater, which is the westernmost of Turrialba’s three craters.

The current cycle of activity at Turrialba began in 2007 with an increase in fumarolic emissions and the opening of cracks in the summit area. Turrialba’s gas emissions caused severe problems for local agricultural communities during 2008 and 2009 because of acid burning of vegetation: crops have been damaged, and pasture for livestock has also been affected. On 5 January 2010 there was a small eruption, the first since 1866. Gas emissions fell in the aftermath of the eruption, but have increased again subsequently.

Turrialba volcano from the NE, 20 January 2010 (E. Duarte, OVSICORI-UNA)
View of Turrialba volcano from the NE, showing the plume being produced from the new cavity opened by the recent activity. Photograph taken by E. Duarte on 20 January 2010 (OVSICORI-UNA).

On 20 January 2010 an overflight of Turrialba took place (OVSICORI report PDF here) which reported a ‘revitalization of the column of gas and steam with suspended particles’. The photograph above was taken during this overflight. A sustained emission was reported on that day, with a thick, dark plume from the summit moving WNW, the strong wind preventing the plume from rising much above the altitude of the volcano. Some light ashfall was reported in areas near the volcano. ‘Although the transport and distribution of volcanic particles (old ash) is a new occurrence for this eruptive period of Turrialba volcano’, notes the report, ‘the minimal quantity carried this morning could be the first of much more in the near future’ as material eroded from the internal walls of the active conduit is carried up into the plume.

For all our coverage of Turrialba: Turrialba « The Volcanism Blog.

Information
Global Volcanism Program: Turrialba – summary information for Turrialba (1405-07=)
Observatorio Vulcanológico y Sismológico de Costa Rica – Ovsicori website
Volcán Turrialba – information from Ovsicori
Turrialba webcam – Ovsicori’s webcam at Turrialba’s summit
Monitoreo Volcanico (Red Sismológica Nacional) – volcano monitoring updates from the Costa Rican national seismological network

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